Monday, December 21, 2009

"fire OR pussy"

I have been pondering on the the way human brains use "OR" as an operator to link two arguments.

I am convinced that most of them don't use it in the Boolean way, meaning as an operator that expresses purely a mathematical disjunction.

Well, there are always exceptions.

The way that Matt Damon uses it to insult the rugby firemen players in the movie "Departed" is a perfect illustration of that.



video

2 comments:

  1. I think this happens because of the mind's deference to linking thoughts. For instance, if I were told to think of two things, lets say "cats" and "dogs," I would list ways in which they relate to eachother (cats hate dogs, vice-versa) before I would list cat's characteristics and dog's characteristics. I may do this after I think "cats hate dogs" but I would look for the connection first. Humans tend to use the Boolean operator AND before we will use OR. Unless, of course, we are told to choose. Then I would list pros and cons of each and decide, but that's a rather different question than to just pull up information when given multiple values.
    Also, in the case of an argument I must stimulate differences. Therefore I look for connections as well. I make a list of (in the case above) pros and cons for cats and dogs then relate them to each other to decide which side I am on and pull the argument together based on these characteristics.
    This is just what I think.
    -AE

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  2. Tks AE.
    But I did not get how you link 2 objects together.
    Do you use rather OR or AND to link 2 objects?

    AND expresses the fact that something has those 2 objects as attributes.

    exclusive OR expresses the fact that something has either the first object as an attribute or the second object as an attribute, but that something can't have both attributes at the same time.

    By the way, a pure disjunction is expressed by a an exclusive OR.

    For me the boolean OR expresses nothing in fact...

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